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The Power of Gratitude

The Power of Gratitude to improve mental health and wellbeing

Today we’ll be learning about gratitude. Because it is an incredible, incredible tool. Some of you may already practice gratitude in your day to day life and some of you may need a bit of a refresher. I think this is always a topic even though I’ve studied it myself and the research on it is pretty good. It’s always something to come back to. I do a lot of journalling and I find that it’s quite useful to be able to put into words pen to paper, what you’re grateful for because it really does change your brain chemistry.

12 BBQ Season Tips for Staying in Recovery

Summer can be a difficult time in sobriety, but it can also be a great time to be alive. Whether it’s boating, camping, or BBQs, it’s great to spend time outdoors with people whom we love. The challenge, however, is that in the past, these were often situations where we would drink or use substances. So, here are some tips and tricks for avoiding relapse and staying in recovery while enjoying the summer BBQ season.

The Need for LGBTQ+ Mental Health Care

There are many reasons why LGBTQ+ people face higher rates of addiction and mental health disorders than others. According to research, LGBTQ+ people are 2-to-4 times more likely to have a substance use disorder than their heterosexual counterparts.[1] These addictions include alcohol, smoking, and other drugs. Some people, heterosexual or LGBTQ+, report using drugs not only for partying, but also for sex. However, this might happen more often among LGBTQ+ people. Many drugs that are more popular among LGBTQ+ people enhance energy and libido, and increase feelings of intimacy.[2] For some people who have discomfort with their sexual orientation, drugs can lift inhibitions and increase the joy of their nightlife.[3] Some regular community events that are popular with LGBTQ+ people, including circuit parties, more commonly involve drug use. A questionnaire-based study of gay men in San Francisco found that half of the studied population who had attended bars and dance clubs reported using methamphetamine in the past three months.[4] As many as 46% of gay men surveyed reported drug use in the past year.[5] Substance use problems are not exclusive to gay men. Lesbian and bisexual women report higher rates of alcohol use disorders than women of other sexual orientations.