Webinar: Surfing the Second Wave: Maintaining Access During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Surfing the second wave

CCSA is excited to be hosting this webinar today during recovery month and we’re doing this together with EHN Canada, and the New Start Foundation for addiction and mental health. Surfing the second wave and maintaining service access during COVID-19 pandemic. CCSA has been involved in recovery month activities across the country for at least five years now. The topic of service access is important to us, especially today and it’s timely when we look at what’s happening across our country. As the people we serve face increased challenges on their journeys to wellness, it’s through events, such as these that we can all bring about some change, big or small.

The Need for LGBTQ+ Mental Health Care

There are many reasons why LGBTQ+ people face higher rates of addiction and mental health disorders than others. According to research, LGBTQ+ people are 2-to-4 times more likely to have a substance use disorder than their heterosexual counterparts.[1] These addictions include alcohol, smoking, and other drugs. Some people, heterosexual or LGBTQ+, report using drugs not only for partying, but also for sex. However, this might happen more often among LGBTQ+ people. Many drugs that are more popular among LGBTQ+ people enhance energy and libido, and increase feelings of intimacy.[2] For some people who have discomfort with their sexual orientation, drugs can lift inhibitions and increase the joy of their nightlife.[3] Some regular community events that are popular with LGBTQ+ people, including circuit parties, more commonly involve drug use. A questionnaire-based study of gay men in San Francisco found that half of the studied population who had attended bars and dance clubs reported using methamphetamine in the past three months.[4] As many as 46% of gay men surveyed reported drug use in the past year.[5] Substance use problems are not exclusive to gay men. Lesbian and bisexual women report higher rates of alcohol use disorders than women of other sexual orientations.

Bright Lights During Dark Times: Clifford’s Spotlight

When speaking to Clifford, it becomes apparent very quickly that he has a big heart and an even bigger sense of duty. Clifford is the night shift nursing team lead who had to step up in a big way when Grace, Bellwood’s head of nursing, was nearly locked out of the country after visiting her family on vacation. When Grace was overseas, coronavirus was just background noise. Numbers were beginning to grow in other areas of the world, but in Canada, most of us were blissfully unaware of the impending lockdown.

Addiction Treatment and Recovery in a Time of Social Distancing and Coronavirus

Addiction Treatment and Recovery in a Time of Social Distancing and Coronavirus

Times are strange. With the constantly developing national and global coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, people with addiction and mental health disorders may experience unique challenges with self-quarantine and isolation. We’ve had many calls to our Admissions Counsellors to discuss our infection prevention plan and learn about the precautionary measures that we’re taking to protect our patients … Read more

Is Declining Life Expectancy in Canada Due to Mental Health, Addiction, and Suicide?

Life expectancy in Canada declining. Grieving couple at friend's funeral.

According to a 2018 study published in The Canadian Medical Association Journal, life expectancy in Canada is higher than in the United States.[1] However, the rates of “deaths of despair” (i.e. poisoning, suicide, and alcoholic liver disease) have increased in recent years which may be contributing to declining life expectancy in Canada.[2] Should we be … Read more

Safety precautions against COVID-19

COVID-19 should not prevent someone from being able to receive life-saving addiction and mental health treatment. Rest assured that we are taking every step possible to protect our current patient population from contracting the infection.

Our facilities have policies and protocols in place to protect patients, including screening new patients, limiting visitors, and moving aftercare groups to online meetings.

Continue to our action plan to see what we are doing to protect our patients from COVID-19.