The Need for LGBTQ+ Mental Health Care

There are many reasons why LGBTQ+ people face higher rates of addiction and mental health disorders than others. According to research, LGBTQ+ people are 2-to-4 times more likely to have a substance use disorder than their heterosexual counterparts.[1] These addictions include alcohol, smoking, and other drugs. Some people, heterosexual or LGBTQ+, report using drugs not only for partying, but also for sex. However, this might happen more often among LGBTQ+ people. Many drugs that are more popular among LGBTQ+ people enhance energy and libido, and increase feelings of intimacy.[2] For some people who have discomfort with their sexual orientation, drugs can lift inhibitions and increase the joy of their nightlife.[3] Some regular community events that are popular with LGBTQ+ people, including circuit parties, more commonly involve drug use. A questionnaire-based study of gay men in San Francisco found that half of the studied population who had attended bars and dance clubs reported using methamphetamine in the past three months.[4] As many as 46% of gay men surveyed reported drug use in the past year.[5] Substance use problems are not exclusive to gay men. Lesbian and bisexual women report higher rates of alcohol use disorders than women of other sexual orientations.

Meditation and Mindfulness: Benefits and Exercises

Meditation and Mindfulness: Benefits and Exercises

The year has been off to a rocky start, with conflicts in the Middle East, plane crashes, political and ethical issues with a certain president whose name rhymes with “rump,” and then a global lockdown due the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic—and all this before spring! No doubt everyone is feeling the effects of such turmoil and changes to their lives and daily routines.

Your Greatest Present is Presence: Tristan’s Holiday Story

Alumni Interview by EHN Staff In this blog post series, EHN alumni share their experience, strength, and hope for the holiday season. Before recovery, Tristan’s holidays were forgettable for him, and painful for his family. He remembers one particular Christmas around 2005, when he was full into the grips of alcohol addiction. He spent the … Read more

Safety precautions against COVID-19

COVID-19 should not prevent someone from being able to receive life-saving addiction and mental health treatment. Rest assured that we are taking every step possible to protect our current patient population from contracting the infection.

Our facilities have policies and protocols in place to protect patients, including screening new patients, limiting visitors, and moving aftercare groups to online meetings.

Continue to our action plan to see what we are doing to protect our patients from COVID-19.