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Top Ten Online Addiction Recovery Resources

Addiction is a disease that affects so many aspects of our being.  Its very nature is complex, which makes it really challenging for many who are not addicted- to understand why people develop it in the first place. The truth is that addiction hijacks the brain and makes it difficult to understand, regardless of the consequences being faced, when professional help is needed.

Once you realize that you need help, it’s not always clear as to where to start or who to talk to.

If you have started contemplating about addiction recovery, sobriety, “getting clean”- whatever you want to call it, here is our list of the top ten online addiction recovery resources you can refer to:

1. Alcoholics Anonymous: This is a fellowship of recovering alcoholics who get together and share their experiences to gain strength from each other to stay sober. Groups can be found all across the world.
2. Drug and Alcohol Helpline: This website contains Ontario resources for healthcare professionals and the general public for substance abuse.
3. The National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC): If you or someone you know needs help with an eating disorder, this non-profit organization can help. This website contains information, education and support for Canadian healthcare professionals and the general public.
4. International Institute for Trauma & Addiction Professionals (IITAP): This website is for both healthcare professionals and the general public seeking help for sex addiction and associated disorders. They promote the highest level of professional standards among practitioners that treat sex addiction.
5. Sex Addicts Anonymous: Is a world-wide fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other so they may overcome their sex addiction and help others recover.
6. Responsible Gambling Council (RGC): This organization helps individuals and communities address gambling in a healthy and responsible way through information, awareness/ prevention, professional development and research.
7. Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH): is a government funded Canadian research facility and hospital that provides education and support for addiction and other mental health issues.
8. Addictions Ontario: Is a non-profit charitable association that works with and for its members to provide the best possible addiction resources for individuals in Ontario.
9. Hazelden: A treatment and research facility located in the US that provides excellent education and support tools to help you start and maintain sobriety.
10. Bellwood Health Services: We are an international leader in addiction treatment with 30 years of experience. Bellwood has programs that are accredited with exemplary standing and have high success rates. Bellwood offers education, counselling, outpatient and inpatient programs.

Still need help with your addiction? Give Bellwood’s counsellors a call and learn how we can help you get on your road to recovery: 1-800-387-6198.

Tips for problem gamblers during the holiday season

In my previous post, I talked about general tips on coping during the holidays. But if you are recovering from a gambling problem, there are additional challenges. This is the shopping season and the time of big sales. There are a lot of deals and it is tempting to over-spend. A big debt can be a trigger for relapse. It’s dangerous because it can easily lead to thinking of ways to make quick money.

Stay focused on your budget. Keep your receipts and be accountable. Controlling finances and making restitution payments are a major part of recovery from a gambling problem. If you need help staying on track, get your partner or a family member involved.

When spending time with family and friends, be careful about having a few drinks. Remember, drinking lowers inhibitions. What do you do when you get together? Do you play cards? Make sure you have a safety plan around entertainment.

Control your car so that you are not dependent on someone else for transportation. Have enough money for a taxi. Be prepared to leave some functions in order to protect yourself.

Hopefully, families and friends will be sensitive to your recovery and not give you lottery tickets. However, if you receive one, plan what you will do with it.

If you successfully navigated through all the activities, look back at how you did it? What went well, what would you do differently next time? Be cautious about being complacent. Some people survive the holidays only to relapse in January.

Be well everyone!

M. Linda Bell
Chief Executive Officer – Bellwood Health Services